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Category: Bloom Day

  • Garden Blogger Bloom Day – May 2012

    May 15, 2012
    Hardy Fuchsia under Japanese Laceleaf Maple

    Hardy Fuchsia under Japanese Laceleaf Maple

    Finding blooms in May isn’t hard, especially this year. We’ve had lots of warm, sunny days interspersed with rain. The plants are loving it and really showing their stuff.

    This makes the bees really happy too. Our bumblers are the size of hummingbirds this spring. And, Ballard Bee Company has installed two new honeybee hives in the garden, so everything’s all a-buzz. May has been light on rain and heavy on warm, sunny days so the blooms are popping early & lasting longer than they often do in our usual, rainy, cool Seattle springs. We’ll take it!

    Enkianthus in Pink

    Enkianthus in Pink

    Jack Frost Brunnera in Dappled Shade

    Jack Frost Brunnera in Dappled Shade

    Huge Bumblebee harvesting from Geranium

    Huge Bumblebee harvesting from Geranium

  • Garden Blogger Bloom Day – January 2012

    January 15, 2012
    Arbutus unedo

    Arbutus unedo blooming well past its usual fall flower season

    Today the big news is snow!

    That being said, a few intrepid winter flowers are coloring up the garden even as the snow flurries all ’round.

    Fortunately, these hardy plants feed the birds and bees during times like these when foraging is rough for wildlife.

    Year-round flowers mean much more than just eye candy for humans. For wildlife, they can mean the difference between surviving winter or dying a cold, frigid death on days like today.

    Enjoy the beauty ahead!

    Witch Hazel

    Hamamelis: a Hummingbird banquet in January

    Garrya elliptica

    Long chains of Garrya's silvery-green-white are just beginning to break open

    Schizostylis

    A lone Schizostylis bud glowing pink in the cold

    Sarcococca confusa

    Perfuming the garden: Sarcococca confusa blooms

  • Garden Blogger Bloom Day – August 2011

    August 15, 2011
    Hardy Fuchsia

    Beautiful Hardy Fuchsia: A favorite of Hummingbirds & with Edible Berries!

    Last week this blog’s updates were all about food. But here’s a reminder: most all those delicious veggies are actually fruit. And without the flowers, we wouldn’t get those tasty nuggets. And, in many cases, without a visit from the bees to the flowers, well, the food wouldn’t form.

    So, let’s take a quick peek at what’s blooming in the garden this August — from flowers the feed us to those that feed the bees to some that just look darn pretty!

    Mexican Oregano

    Mexican Oregano: For Cooking in the Kitchen & Feeding the Bees

    Saucy Paste Tomato Flower

    Green Tomatoes Formed & Flowers Keep Coming on this Saucy Paste Variety

    Love Lies Bleeding

    Curtains of Love Lies Bleeding - a plant you can pet & many varieties are edible too!

    Foxley Thyme & Honeybee

    Foxely Thyme is uniquely beautiful, edible & a favorite of our honeybees

    Hardy Fuchsia

    Another Darling Hardy Fuchia near Monkshood Foliage

  • Garden Blogger Bloom Day – June 2011

    June 15, 2011
    Red Lilies Just Opened Today!

    Red Lilies Just Opened Today!

    It’s been an interesting spring ’round these parts. Plants that should have bloomed in early May are still blooming now. Some plants that should have bloomed in mid-May still haven’t opened yet. Pollen from early and late bloomers has combined at times to make for an exceptionally hellish allergy season. And, the cool & wet just keeps on coming. Still, the garden’s loving all the rain and looking quite beautiful despite all the crazy bloom cycle mix ups…especially after last night’s rain & this morning’s sunbreaks!

    Just a few quick selections for your enjoyment!

    Climbing Hydrangea - Another post dedicated to this beauty coming soon!

    Climbing Hydrangea - Another post dedicated to this beauty coming soon!

    Hebe Procumbens creeping across ton granite boulder seats

    Hebe Procumbens creeping across ton granite boulder seats

    Peony stil in bud; should have opened and bloomed weeks ago!

    Peony stil in bud; should have opened and bloomed weeks ago!

    Stinky Valerian - a Beautiful Bee Favorite!

    Stinky Valerian - a Beautiful Bee Favorite!

    Naturalized Columbine intermingles late this year with Hardy Fuchsia

    Naturalized Columbine intermingles late this year with Hardy Fuchsia

    Pretty Pink Rhodie Usually Finishes Blooming by Early May; Not This Year

    Pretty Pink Rhodie Usually Finishes Blooming by Early May; Not This Year

    Whoa Nellie - This Clematis Just Blooms & Blooms!

    Whoa Nellie - This Clematis Just Blooms & Blooms!

  • Garden Blogger Bloom Day – December 2010

    December 15, 2010
    The Beginnings of the 2010 Thanksgiving Snow

    The Beginnings of the 2010 Thanksgiving Snow

    December Bloom Day is the one where I got nuthin’.

    Granted, right now is that time of year when, for about 2 weeks, there are often no blooms in my garden. Drop by in a week or so, and the chains of my Garrya, the Christmas-red cheer of my Yuletide Camellia and the hummingbird-feeding yellow of my Hamamelis will be starting to pop.

    But right now, nadda.

    Even shrubs that usually offer interesting berries are looking sad, following a Thanksgiving freeze for which many an evergreen wasn’t ready. The bees worked hard in spring to pollinate our big Cotoneaster, which the robins had been watching closely as the berries ripened. (They really like to eat them once ripe and after the first light freezes, which helps them ferment and gets the birds so drunk they fall off branches like the boozers they are.) Bummer for them, the snow of Thanksgiving week turned those reddening morsels a gray shade of brown. No Christmas berry nog in my garden for my namesakes this holiday season.

    Fortunately, the evergreen rhodies and manzanitas that didn’t take a hard hit in the November freeze are looking good. Especially after Bob draped them with lights for the holidays! Too,  Twig dogwoods, hardy sword ferns, multi-colored Nandina and peeling bark on various Acers and Crepe Myrtles are taking a starring role during this dreary December interlude. Garden art, dish stones filled with bird bathing water, and nurselogs are all starring in this month’s bloom day —  a day, sadly without a bloom.

  • Garden Blogger Bloom Day – November 2010

    November 15, 2010
    Statue graced by lingering Eryssimum blossom

    Statue graced by lingering Erysimum blossom

    It may be bloom day out here in the blogosphere, but in my garden it’s anything but. A few stragglers are putting on last shows before the winter bloomers kick into gear. It’s during these times I’m especially grateful for evergreens, garden art and stone, peely & colorful bark, fall leaf color, and ripening berries. Tall Miscanthus feather-duster plumes sway in the breeze even as the blades begin to yellow for winter. Many trees are bare, yet late-coloring Acer griseum is just beginning to show its red autumn beauty. Grape hyacinth strappy foliage is already emerging from the ground to wait out the winter and bloom early in spring. Cotoneaster lacteus berry color is deepening, now an orange-red will become Santa-suit red with the first freezes.

    When the garden is no longer a riot of mid-summer color, those pops that do grace our spaces take on new importance and often strike an even more powerful cord as they peek out from below the mountain of leaves we find ourselves forever raking in November. There’s something powerful in these reminders that despite the shorter, darker, seemingly barren days of autumn and winter, the garden — the earth itself — is alive beneath our feet.

    Although a few mums, salvias, Arbutus,  late lilies, and fuchsia continue to bloom (and feed the hungry hummingbirds) , I sought out some of the more surprising elements of color to share for this month’s bloom day. Enjoy! (more…)

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