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Snowberry Goodness

October 28, 2016

As autumn wind and rain denudes gardens of fleeting fall foliage, scrubby native snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus) begins to shine in the wild and in cultivated landscapes.

snowberry plant

Soon this snowberry hedgerow will be bare of leaves & the bright, white berries will take center stage.

Together with rose hips, seed pods, cones, evergreens and colorful twigs, long-lingering berries offer visual respite during the short, dim days of winter. And, while some of these provide forage for wildlife, snowberry berries aren’t very popular on most wildlife menus. So, those white, hold-fast fruits brighten the twiggy hedgerows and dark forest understory in many deer, squirrel and bird-infested gardens for many months. (But let’s be clear, some wild and domestic critters are likely to give your shrubs at least a little nibble now and then.)

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Snowberry is a scrubby, deciduous, North American native shrub that is adapted to a wide range of habitats. Growing to about three to five feet tall and wide, it thrives in dark understories as well as sunny roadsides. It plugs along steadily in damp or even dry soil. And, while its grey-green foliage may succumb to a bit of powdery mildew in the most stressful environments, it’s a tough shrub to kill through placement choices or neglect. Its diminutive pink flowers are favored by many wild bees whose pollination efforts lead to weighty clusters of fruit.

To ensure those white winter berries really shine, give your shrubs an evergreen backdrop. Native mahonia, evergreen huckleberry or even a few sword ferns can do the trick in a shadier spot. If you’re gardening in the sun, consider mixing snowberry with wild, hippy roses — especially in a hedgerow, which offers protective habitat all year for wildlife.

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(You can support this blog by buying through our links. Purchases made through the affiliate links on this page and others on this site pay a small percentage to Garden Mentors but don’t cost you anything extra. Thank you for buying and helping support us!)